PAPUA NEW GUINEA

Surface area: 462 840 km2
Population: 3.9 million

1. LAWS OF METROLOGY

(i)Trade Measurement Act 1978 and Weights and Measures Regulation 
(ii) National Institute of Standards and Industrial Technology Act 1993 packaging Act 1978
(iii)Packaging Act 1978

1.1 Legal requirements for traceability

(i) Trade Measurement Act 1978
(ii) NISIT Act 1993

2. LEGAL UNITS OF MEASUREMENT

Papua New Guinea declared the SI units as legal units of measurement in this country in 1980. Any other units of measurement other than the SI units used for trade purposes in PNG is illegal. 

3. STRUCTURE OF METROLOGICAL CONTROL AUTHORITIES

3.1 National organisation for legal metrology

In Papua New Guinea, this consists of two organisations, namely:
(i) National Institute of Standards and Industrial Technology (NISIT) for:

* advanced legal metrology;
* bulk measuring instruments and;
* pattern approval.

(ii) Consumer Affairs Council for routine consumer protection areas, i.e.
* mechanical scales, bowlers, measuring tackles etc.
All manuals and guidelines used are based on those of the National Standards Commission of Australia and OIML.

3.2 Custodian of National Standards

Under the NISIT Act 1993, the National Institute of Standards and Industrial Technology (NISIT) is responsible for the maintenance of primary, secondary and reference of PNG measurement standards, and from time to time, may appoint other regulatory authorities as 
custodian of measurement standards of certain physical quantities. In December 1994, NISIT adopted the Australian primary standards as PNG primary standards. 
Under the Trade Measurement Act, the PNG Consumer Affairs Council is responsible for the maintenance of Inspectors' standards pertaining to mass, volume and length. 

3.3 National organisation responsible for maintaining primary standards

See clause 3.2 above.

3.4 Regional and local verification organisations

See clause 3.2 above.
NATA accredited laboratories in Queensland do also verify metrological equipment in Papua New Guinea.

3.5 Instrument calibration and evaluation systems

In Papua New Guinea only NISIT currently provides basic calibration services in the fields of mass and thermometry.
In terms of national measurement standards, NISIT maintains its standards against the Australian primary standards which are in turn calibrated at the required interval against international prototype standards.
These are calibration services provided by overseas agencies such as FSC and Australian Calibration Service Pty. Ltd. to organisations in Papua New Guinea.

4. RANGE OF EQUIPMENT SUBJECT TO LEGAL METROLOGY

5. TYPE APPROVAL ( i.e. PATTERN APPROVAL)

At its present infant stage NISIT is requiring that patterns must be approved by NSC of Australia.

6. VERIFICATION (CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT), INSPECTION AND REVERIFICATION

6.1 Legal and technical requirements for verification and reverification

Similar to clause 6. 1 of Australia's entry to the Directory.

6.2 Range of equipment verified and reverified and any statistical information available

The following types of instruments are tested, and Table 1 describes the types and number of legal metrology equipment used in Papua New Guinea.
Type of instrument
Total tested
Bulk weighers
150
Flow meters
120
Vehicle tanks and dipsticks
230
Length measures
60
Masses
350
weigh bridges
70
weighing Instruments
500
 
Table 1. Type and number of legal metrology equipment used in Papua New Guinea

7. ACCRED ITATION AND CERTIFICATION SYSTEMS

7.1 Accreditation systems for legal metrology, calibration and testing laboratories.Traceability to national, regional, international or foreign measurement standards.

The proposed Papua New Guinea national certification system of conformity under NISIT is to consist of the following certification and accreditation schemes namely:
The calibration system and hierarchy of physical units and standards in Papua New Guinea is shown in Figure 1.

8. LEGAL METROLOGY PRACTITIONERS

8.1 Numbers

In Papua New Guinea, we have only four inspectors to inspect PNC with a population
approaching 4 million.
This inspection is supported by four standards officers who have to undertake weights and measures inspection as part of their duties; The four standards officers have been appointed and gazetted as weights and measures inspectors.

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